Electromagnetic Fields and the Earth Connection

MyTaiChiLife

Last night on Coast to Coast AM, guests Gregg Braden and Howard Martin talked about the connection between the earth’s magnetic field and us, positing that not only does it affect us, but we can affect it, creating fields that are chaotic or fields that are ordered and in balance. Martin particularly focused on the heart as a center of electric activity in humans that can be focused on and used to create positive energy both to our own brains and to the world at large.

There has never been any doubt in my mind that monastics of all religions and of all ages have served to keep the world from spinning out of control. But you can imagine the force they are up against when they are in such a minority against the “heartfelt” feelings of hate, greed, lust, and so on. But now we can intuitivcely understand that…

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Elon Musk: Tesla can make a few million cars a year by 2025

Gigaom

Electric car company Tesla’s stated long-term goal has been to make 500,000 electric cars a year by 2020, but on Tuesday at the Detroit Auto Show, Tesla CEO Elon Musk raised the bar even higher. He said in an onstage Q&A, (live blogged by the Verge), that he thinks Tesla can make a few millions cars a year by 2025.

[blockquote person=”” attribution=””]
“We’re going to keep driving our volume as high as we can because our goal is fundamentally to transition the world to electric cars.”[/blockquote]

Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla, unveils the dual engine chassis of the new Tesla 'D' model at the Hawthorne Airport October 09, 2014 in Hawthorne, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images) Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla, unveils the dual engine chassis of the new Tesla ‘D’ model at the Hawthorne Airport October 09, 2014 in Hawthorne, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

In [company]Tesla[/company]’s most recent earnings, the company was estimating that it would ship about 33,000 vehicles in 2014, and that’s with selling the Model S only. Tesla’s Model X goes…

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MongoDB confirms an $80M funding round

Gigaom

NoSQL startup MongoDB is aiming to raise $100 million and has already taken in $79.9 million, according to a SEC document that the company filed this week and has confirmed to Gigaom.

The new cash influx comes after a $150 million funding round the startup landed in October 2013 when the company was then valued at $1.2 billion.

MongoDB is a hot commodity in the NoSQL database space, where it competes with Couchbase an DataStax, among others. In their last investment rounds, Couchbase and DataStax have raised $60 million and $106 million, respectively.

MongoDB has also been figuring out how to make money as a company that’s built around open source software. In October, MongoDB unveiled its MongoDB Management Service, designed to help users scale and manage their databases; the startup is banking that the new service will generate a lot of revenue. It also added paid support (or what it…

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Obstacle avoidance is the next big step for drones

Gigaom

Consumer drones have come a long way in just a few years, evolving from complex hobbyist models to consumer-ready quadcopters with increasingly smart cameras and controls. But they are still unable to autonomously avoid obstacles — an ability that would completely change the flying experience and make drone-based services much, much safer.

That is slowly changing through startups like DroneDeployAirware and Panoptes, and now Ascending Technologies, which made a big splash at this year’s CES.

A worker demonstrates the collision avoidance capability of an AscTec Firefly multi-copter drone with Intel RealSense cameras at CES on January 6, 2015. A worker demonstrates the collision avoidance capability of an AscTec Firefly multi-copter drone with Intel RealSense cameras at CES on January 6, 2015.

AscTec, which makes professional-level drones, will begin shipping its “Firefly” drone with obstacle-detecting sensors later this year. It incorporate’s IBM’s RealSense 3D cameras, which Wired reported are smaller and lighter than other options.

Five years ago, it would have been impossible to build a setup like AscTec’s. Moderately sized drones are limited…

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